Don Melton on Team Building

Added on by Bryan Clark.

I came across an episode of the Vector podcast, where Rene Ritchie interviewed Don Melton on team building. It's a wonderful, timeless episode on what it takes to build a great team. (Go listen to it!)

One section resonated really deeply with me, where Don talks about what he'd look for when he interviewed candidates at Apple. It takes place about 14 minutes in to the show:

This is what I've found, and I've actually used this over the years:

Smart is greater than Knowledgeable.

Intelligence and problem-solving skills are [almost] always more valuable than specific domain knowledge... That's because domain knowledge changes over time; it gets stale - and I would rather have a whole team of generalists than just a few specialists.

You have to have people who are able to be generalists, because they can reapply what they know to new problem domains... you can be flexible like that.

Being Teachable is even better than being Smart. You have to ask yourself: can you teach them, even if they're not mart now? Can they learn quickly, and eventually become experts? Do they have headroom? Can they grow?

So, Teachable is even more important than being Smart.

But.

There's something that's even more valuable than being "Teachable", and that's being Passionate. You have to ask - will they do it? If you have somebody that's Knowledgeable, that's Intelligent, that's Teachable - are they going to go for the long haul? Are they willing to make the effort? Because people on a mission like that are not to be trifled with - they're The Crazy Ones. Passion - it's so important - it's this little burning seed in there, you've got to have the "fire in the belly" - very, very important.

But.

What I've found over the years that trumps all, that trumps even Passionate, has always been Trust. Are they trustworthy? It actually might be even more important than Passionate. Can I trust this person to finish the job, to complete what they said they'd do? It's absolutely the hardest thing to evaluate in a job interview, you've got like 30-45 minutes with a person, how do you do that?

(Teachability is also difficult to evaluate in an interview, but it's nowhere near as [difficult] as Trustworthiness.)

You really have to learn to peer into the soul of people to try to figure [Trustworthiness] out, but it also helps if you know some history. It really helps if you know the candidate personally, or if someone you already trust knows them and knows them to be trustworthy.

Hiring someone you Trust, by the way - it's just fabulous, because Trust is peace of mind at night, because you can actually go to bed and get a good night's sleep, because you can trust that person to come through. It's a delight.

How I got started with iOS design and development

Added on by Bryan Clark.

Here’s a little collection of my favorite books, tutorials, and tools that helped me get started with iOS design and development. There are a bunch of books and tutorials that didn’t make the cut for this list - this is a (fairly) concise list of what I think helped me the most.

(Quick note: the website won’t let me rearrange the list, so start with the books at the bottom of the page.)

A year ago

Added on by Bryan Clark.

…a year ago, I lived in San Francisco. (I didn’t even know that I’d be moving.)

…a year ago, Natalia and I were still living in separate places. Now we’re engaged and live in Seattle.

…a year ago, Threadnote was a very, very rough prototype. It was ugly, full of bugs, and while Ryan and I had a vision of what it might be, I felt an uneasiness about how I’d make it work out.

…a year ago, I hadn’t even been contacted about donating my stem cells. (Whoever you are, hope you’re enjoying them!)

…a year ago, I was designing eCommerce websites for Deloitte’s clients. I hadn’t yet transferred into making iOS apps.

…a year ago, I didn’t even know Jesse.

…a year ago, I had an itch to do something more, and I’m really glad I scratched it. Day by day, it didn’t feel like much, but holy shit, looking back? My life is completely different.

Everything changed in 2012. Some of that change was scary. Some of it was dull. Some of it came out of nowhere.

Here’s to 2013.

Use the "-" button to take stills while filming video on the iPhone

Added on by Bryan Clark.

I noticed this on New Year’s Eve this year: if you’re taking a video on the iPhone, you can simultaneously take a still photo by pressing the “-” volume button on the side of the phone.

Pressing the “+” volume button will start/stop recording video.

(There’s also an onscreen button for doing these tasks, but when it comes to using the iPhone’s camera, nothing beats using the hardware shortcuts!)

Image

UICollectionView tutorial

Added on by Bryan Clark.

My buddy Bryan Hansen’s crafted an amazing UICollectionView tutorial. If you’re getting started with this iOS 6 framework, (and you probably should be) then block out a couple hours and work through this thing. 

Responsive Television

Added on by Bryan Clark.

Sometimes, you watch TV on a small screen, sometimes you watch TV on a big screen. Sometimes you’re close to it, other times you’re not. Some TV watchers have 20/20 vision, others don’t.

What if TV adapted to your viewing, the same way that responsive websites adapt to differently-sized devices?

With the confluence of web-enabled televisions, streaming internet video, and a growing cultural appreciation for design, customization of electronics, and accessiblity, this might be a reasonable thing to see in the near future: a television that not only shows you *what* you want to see, but *how* you’d like to see it.

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The Deadliest Interface

Added on by Bryan Clark.

Here is a Chevy stereo in 1954:

old_chevy.jpg

There are 7 controls. Two dials for volume and selecting a station, and five station presets. You could master this system in a few seconds. The controls are all physical, so you don’t have to take your eyes off the road to find the one you want.

Here is a Chevy stereo in 2010:

new_chevy.jpg

There are 24 controls, and a large screen containing menus, submenus, and settings. This is a very complex interface, and I know that there’s a lot of thought that’s gone into it, but it’s still a very, very complicated one compared to the 1954 dashboard.

Then the real bugger arrives: the auxillary (AUX) cable:

aux_cable.jpg

This little guy connects to your phone, and therein lies the trouble. Everyone (myself included) plugs their phone into their car stereo, and the result is terribly dangerous. You’ve now got a mini-computer that has no manual controls, so it requires that you operate it with your eyes, and it’s holding the tastiest, freshest, most dopamine-inducing experience glowing right there in your hand. A hand that should probably be at 10-and-2 on the wheel, right?

This interface, while delightful on the couch, is quite deadly on the road. We know that messaging while driving is very dangerous, but how often do you use your phone to:

  • Lead a conference call
  • Reply to that urgent email from your boss
  • Make that perfect playlist for the rest of your car trip
  • Playlist? Nah. Let’s just make a Pandora station…
  • Pandora? Nah. Let’s download that awesome NPR podcast about Breaking Bad.
  • …but why **listen** when you can **watch**? Let’s finish up that documentary on Netflix, yeah?
  • …or better yet, go for 3 stars on that Angry Birds level?
  • OMG, did you see that guy using his iPad while driving? Let’s fire up the Camera app to take a picture and tweet about it…

The interface of linking your car’s dashboard to your phone and/or manually operating its contents is really, really awful.

There are a few parts to solving this problem:

  1. Auto makers: Please design a car interface that is compelling enough for us to stop plugging our phones into the AUX input.
  2. Phone makers: Keep up the good work with those voice-input tools.
  3. Drivers: I know this is naggy, but can we put the phone on silent and leave them in a pocket? Maybe print up the directions before leaving the house, or burn a few CDs to listen to in the car? Bonus points if you leave your phone in your bag.

I am just as guilty as anyone of driving while distracted, but maybe that’s the real solution: get rid of the driving. If Google can hurry up and get their self-driving car on the road, maybe we can all get back to our Angry Birds.

Then we all win. (Except for those green pigs.)

(Images came from here, here, and here.)

Open

Added on by Bryan Clark.

We often hear the term “open” in regards to open-source software, but today I read an amazing definition that I hadn’t considered before:

If we want to define how “open” any industry is, we should start with a number: the cost of entry. By this we simply mean the monetary cost of getting into the business with a reasonable shot at reaching customers. Is it in the neighborhood of $100? $10,000? Or more like $1 billion? Whatever the magnitude, that number, most definitively, is what determines whether an industry is open or closed.

-Tim Wu, The Master Switch: The Rise and Fall of Information Empires

This definition of “open” strikes me as a more complete definition. If it’s all about the cost of entry, it encompasses the open-source argument, but it brings with it some added implications.

By Wu’s definition, the barriers of entry to reaching customers are what determine openness. By this definition, I’d argue that Apple’s iOS development community is more open than Android’s: the barriers to getting a good product into the hands of paying customers are far fewer. Yes, the iOS developer program costs $100, but look at what that affords you: access to a massive and growing collection of customers who are far more likely to pay you for your product, and instead of wrestling with device fragmentation, you only have to develop for two screen sizes.

Wu’s “open” has implications for other industries:

  • We talk about whether our political process is transparent —-look at the high net worth of our politicians, and it’s clear that there are financial requirements for getting your voice heard in this country.
  • We talk about the importance of education in our society, but when tuition prices skyrocket, our society becomes less of a free and open community. If you graduate and are burdened by debt, you are less likely to pursue your dreams, and more likely to work for the highest (or only) bidder.
  • The recent battles over patents show that if the cost of defending yourself is too high, then the patent system truly isn’t open to small innovators.
  • Sometimes, we want communities to be closed. Doctors, for example, should have to struggle to become doctors, or else we couldn’t be sure of the quality of their work. (I personally think that medical school should be inexpensive yet challenging, but let’s save that for another post.)
  • The declining costs of getting your message out to the world is what’s driving the free and open exchange of ideas on blogging platforms like Wordpress, Tumblr, Twitter, and Facebook. Folks who used to read the newspaper can now participate in the discussion, and the old media empires can’t keep up with this new, open world.

PS: This book has been incredible so far. I found it through Seth Godin, and it is full of annotations on my Kindle. So good!

Siri's Operations Center

Added on by Bryan Clark.

In the spirit of @jwswj’s post about what it must be like to see the collective Photo Stream of all iOS users, here’s what I imagine the Siri “operation room” to sound like:

YouTube - Superman Listening to Everything

Could you imagine? Listening to all of those Siri questions coming in from around the globe… granted, many of them might be dumb jokes, but there’s got to be somebody listening to all of these recordings, analyzing them in aggregate, and using this to improve the service.

What would that room sound like? 

What would their analysis tools look like?

The User Experience of In-N-Out's Menu

Added on by Bryan Clark.

The secret highlight, the real reason for any great Californian roadtrip is that it’s a chance to indulge in a local delicacy: In-N-Out. There are all kinds of mystery and myth around the company, but I’d like to posit one more great thing about the place: they have the world’s best-designed menu.

image

If you’re a new customer, you only have to answer one simple, obvious question:

“How hungry are you?”

All of the menu items are the same: they’re burgers, with different quantities of meat and cheese. That’s it. There’s no mystery to it. If you are new to the In-N-Out experience, there’s no time lost staring at a big menu, and worrying that you’re going to pick a bad menu item. 

There’s only one menu item. You can’t make a bad choice here.

For “advanced users”, of course, there is the secret menu: the culinary equivalent of a keyboard shortcut, a way to try out varieties on the classic. Add some sauce, order a grilled cheese, get your fries done extra-crispy; it’s all up to you.

But if you’re a new customer, you’ll walk away feeling like you got to try California’s classic burger; you only had one choice to make, and it was easy. You’ve now experienced the tradition of In-N-Out, and it was painless. You feel like you know it well.

For those repeat customers, they feel just a bit clever. And once you find out about the secret menu, you’re that much more inspired to come back.

In-N-Out. Famous for their burgers, (although nothing beats Dick’s Drive In in Seattle!) but also home to the world’s best menu design.

(Image: Flickr)